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Poverty

Lynn Kseibi – Syrian Journalist
Unable to breathe, Ahmad woke up in the middle of the night suffocating and was in urgent need of hospitalization. Um Ibraheem rushed him to the hospital for ventilation but the economic crisis has severely stripped hospitals of the equipment necessary to treat his case.
Myriam Sweidan
As a consequence of the unprecedented currency crisis, Lebanon is falling hungry. And the worst is yet to come …
Hazem El Amin
As Tripoli suffers, an homage to Lebanon’s only true city, for is there any other city in the country so generously blessed with stories and books, each presenting it with a different scent, a different face?
Maksim Othman
The Caesar Act has caused the cost of life in Syria to skyrocket. People eat bread with tomato puree and pepper spread over two meals a day. With the streets empty, pockets empty and tables empty, how can the Syrians ever rise up again?
Tarik Miri
As winter has arrived, Syria is facing a second wave. Across the country the number of corona cases is on the rise. Most people, however, have other things to worry about.
Mizer Kamal
The war was over in Mosul, but other battles were still unfolding. The returnees to the old Iraqi city are still dealing with poverty and disease, and with unidentified bodies buried under the rubble of demolished and mined buildings. Their recovery has become a daily occurrence, no longer newsworthy.
Ahmad Hassan
“This is the case of the tens of thousands of families in Al-Muthanna, and in adjacent governorates, where ignorance and poverty are widespread. Their people, in crises, represent the protectors of doctrine, the depth of the Shiite presence, and in elections, the reservoir of loyal votes. However, in return, no one cares about them..”
Ahmad Al-Ahmad
Markets in Syria seem- like the majority of Syrians in Syria- to be dying slowly, since news of the Caesar Act and its consequences has exhausted them psychologically before it has had the chance to take an effect economically.
Bunasser Al-Taffar – Lebanese writer and rapper
We can ask ourselves: Could there be a convergence between the state’s interests and the farmer’s interests in this legislation under these exceptional circumstances that we are experiencing now? Unfortunately, the answer given the current circumstances is: absolutely not.
Heba Abou Taha
“Before the curfew, my mother used to help me and bring over some items, but I can’t reach her now due to how far she is. We only have some bread crumbs and oil left.” With the ‘Coronavirus’ crisis, the suffering of poor families has increased.
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