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ISIS

Saman Dawood
Sold twice as a slave by ISIS, young Iman learnt the Quran by heart in order to be released. Today she is 20 and studying hard to become a lawyer to defend the Yazidi cause.
Saman Dawood
The fire in the Sharya refugee camp highlights the plight of thousands of displaced Yazidis unable to return to Sinjar, due to the presence of armed groups and political disputes between Baghdad and Erbil.
Abdul salam hussein – Mohamed hassan
Since the start of 2020, 700 organized escapes have taken place in the al-Hol camp for families of former iSIS fighters. Smuggling has become big business. The price depends on the number of people, their age and destination.
Reed Matar
The Egyptian army does not allow people in North Sinai to carry weapons to protect themselves against ISIS. Yet, it also hardly intervenes to protect or negotiate the return of the kidnapped. Copts are particularly hard hit.
Maisar Aladani
The Yazidi Women Survivors Law is a victory, yet many question marks remain. Will the law be implemented or remain ink on paper? How will the land be distributed? And what to do with the children born as a result of rape?
Ali Al Ibrahim – Khalifa Al Khuder
“The corpses the officers had marked we would later dig up and hand back to them. They would ask the victims’ families for $1,500 to $3,000 per body.”
Nawzat Shamdeen
As Pope Francis travels through Iraq, Mosul’s Christians hope his visit will draw attention to their precarious situation, which includes the dossier of some 6,000 stolen properties.
Saman Dawood
Finding the remains of the victims and reburying them is a positive step, yet “just the beginning.” There are dozens of mass graves in Sinjar.
Riad Hamadani
Fatima finds it hard to convince people outside the detention camp that her grandchildren are not responsible for what their parents and grandfather did, and that they do not pose a danger to anyone. Having lived in camps for over three years, most ISIS families still do not know what future lies ahead.
Mizer Kamal
The war was over in Mosul, but other battles were still unfolding. The returnees to the old Iraqi city are still dealing with poverty and disease, and with unidentified bodies buried under the rubble of demolished and mined buildings. Their recovery has become a daily occurrence, no longer newsworthy.
لتصلكم نشرة درج الى بريدكم الالكتروني