Hebollah

Mariam Seifeddine
Ever since Hezbollah’s establishment in the early 1980s, the camera has always accompanied the gun. To Lebanon’s “Party of God,” visuals are as important as arms. In fact, its arms would not have had the power they have, were it not for the power of the image.
Charbel EL-Khoury
The danger lies in the sectarian parties restricting opposition to only a few platforms by threatening people who wish to welcome political gatherings and debate, and calling upon their supporters to boycott their venues
Mariam Seifeddine
Fake accounts are like an unofficial arm of campaigns linked to Hezbollah. These are accounts that omit a name or clear identity, but work in a way that seems coordinated in terms of a unified message and the target.
Maha Gazal
On December 7, Israeli jets for the first time ever bombed Latakia. Syrian air defenses remained idle. As Latakia is only 20 kilometers away from the main Russian military base in the country, it begs the question: did Moscow know and allow the air raid to happen?
Adel Haddad
Macron’s recent visit to Saudi Arabia was the first time a Western leader landed in the kingdom since the murder of Jamal Khashoggi. Just prior to that he signed arms deals worth €17 billion in the UAE. What moves the French President?
Alia Ibrahim – Mohammad Bsiki – Ahmad Abid
Fuel smuggling from Lebanon to Syria is taking place in all kinds of ways. By van, bicycle or donkey, by car, motorcycle or Syrian army trucks. Estimated revenue: some $235 million annually.
Diana Moukalled
The battle against the Beirut Port investigation has never been so blatantly straightforward as it is today. Hezbollah has decided to use the families of the victims in a way that militants use human shields at the heart of the battlefield.
Hazem Elamin – Hala Nasreddine
No less than 346 files in the Pandora Papers concerned Lebanese bankers, businessmen and politicians who for various reasons companies registered in tax havens. 
Rami El-Amin
Saudi and Emirati intelligence agencies used Israel’s Pegasus spyware to massively monitor Iraqi ministers, MPs, ambassadors, journalists, activists and even clerics.
Alia Ibrahim
Will there be a day, when we feel less compelled to look over our shoulder – or at our phones – with fear and suspicion? Is it really possible we will feel safe at home again?
لتصلكم نشرة درج الى بريدكم الالكتروني