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Beirut Explosion

Ghalia Al Alwani- Syrian Journalist
Repression isn’t forgetting. They tell me to never forget, as if I ever will. I won’t ever forget. I won’t ever forget the glass, the blood, the screams or the panic.
Myriam Sweidan
Lebanon finally installed a national commission to deal with the many thousands of missing and forcibly disappeared during the Civil War. It was hardly up and running before half its members resigned …
Wissam Assouad
A heartfelt eyewitness account of August 4, 2020. Wissam was with his friends in Karantina until an hour before the explosion. Moments later, he rushed back to a scene of utter devastation to see if any of them were still alive.
Jana Barakat
“I want to know where my son is. Until now I don’t have any information about his fate.” It has been over two months since the Beirut port explosion, and still people are missing …
Marwa Saab
It is as if the explosion that produced a gaping hole in the ground has opened a similar one in heaven, which continues to receive the souls of the crime’s victims, even after 83 days have passed.
Hazem El Amin
Elias Khoury has become the symbol of our failure to convince his generation – our sons – that Lebanon is a country worth living in. Our sons would say: ‘Look at Elias’ photo. Is that what you want for us too?’
Hazem El Amin
The news of the Ceylon tea incident might have been less complicated but more striking than other news, since it was chosen to be announced by the National News Agency (NNA). A clear-cut piece of news, no beating around the bush! The tea that had been donated to the blast victims was distributed to the officers and elements of the Presidential Guard brigade.
Myriam Sweidan
The tourism sector is a vivid example of the country’s economic decline, with enterprises partially or totally closing down, reducing employees’ salaries, or laying them off completely, particularly by forcing them to offer their resignations.
Samir Skainy
Here are the stories of people who survived, barely living and barely able to narrate their stories; something others were not able to do.
Alia Ibrahim- Lebanese writer and journalist
It is only a matter of time. In days, or maybe weeks, the Lebanese state’s failure to subsidize raw materials like fuel, wheat, and medicine will be announced. There won’t be any loud explosions, but it will be another time bomb that will destroy whatever had survived the crime at the port.
لتصلكم نشرة درج الى بريدكم الالكتروني